Gordon William Bloodworth.

 

  As viewed : -

Left = George William Bloodworth.

Seated = P. M. Stewart.

Right = Isaac Reginald Hughes. 

From a local paper = 16/11/17 = Second Lieutenant Gordon W. Bloodworth, Sherwood Foresters, son of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Bloodworth, High Street Old Fletton, has been promoted Captain. The gallant officer has been in France since February.

From a local paper = 31-5-1918 "MENTIONED IN DISPATCHES"  "Lieut. Gordon W. Bloodworth, Sherwood Foresters, eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. G. W. Bloodworth, of Old Fletton, has been mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig's dispatches, published on Saturday.  Lieut. Bloodworth was wounded on the opening day of the German offensive, March 21st and is now convalescing at Altringham."

Sunday before 15-2-1918 = was with the congregation of the Fletton United Methodist Church whilst home on leave from the front. 

 From a local paper = 5-4-1918"Captain Gordon Bloodworth, Sherwood Foresters, eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. G. W. Bloodworth, 1 St. Margaret's Road, Old Fletton, and husband of Mrs. Bloodworth York Villa, Harris Street, Peterborough, is wounded in the right hand.  On Wednesday a letter was received from Lieut. Bloodworth stating that his wound was not at all serious, and added "But I am pleased to say I am marked for Blighty."  

A further letter announced that he was in hospital in Manchester and that he had been shot through the fingers at 20 yards' range.  Lieutenant Bloodworth joined the Army in October, 1914, and has seen service on the coast in Ireland as well as at the front."

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Information on photos thanks to Vaughan Cullen.

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Newspaper cutting with details of Gordon Bloodworth.  The original paper it was extracted from is not known.

From a local paper dated 31-5-1918 "MENTIONED IN DISPATCHES"  "Lieut. Gordon W. Bloodworth, Sherwood Foresters, eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. G. W. Bloodworth, of Old Fletton, has been mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig's dispatches, published on Saturday.  Lieut. Bloodworth was wounded on the opening day of the German offensive, March 21st and is now convalescing at Altringham."

Sunday before 15-2-1918 = was with the congregation of the Fletton United Methodist Church whilst home on leave from the front.

From a local paper dated 5-4-1918 = "Captain Gordon Bloodworth, Sherwood Foresters, eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. G. W. Bloodworth, 1 St. Margaret's Road, Old Fletton, and husband of Mrs. Bloodworth York Villa, Harris Street, Peterborough, is wounded in the right hand.  On Wednesday a letter was received from Lieut. Bloodworth stating that his wound was not at all serious, and added "But I am pleased to say I am marked for Blighty."  A further letter announced that he was in hospital in Manchester and that he had been shot through the fingers at 20 yards' range.  Lieutenant Bloodworth joined the Army in October, 1914, and has seen service on the coast in Ireland as well as at the front."  

Local newspaper entries indicate that by 18th December 1914 Private G. W. Bloodworth had been promoted to the rank of Provisional Corporal at the time it was indicated that he was serving as soldier number 843 in the 2/1st Huntingdonshire Cyclist Battn.

Corpl. G. E. Bloodworth, by the 10/4/1915 he had been promoted to Acting Sergeant in C Company of the 2/1st H C B.

He came from  'Newlyn' - 134 High Street, Old Fletton and enlisted on the 27/10/14 at Huntingdon into the 2/1st H C B. 

He served in the 2nd Sherwood Forester and the 7th Notts. & Derby Regt. He was wounded March 1918 and sent to hospital in Altringham wounded in right hand.  He was promoted in the Huntingdonshire Reserve Battalion from Corporal to Sergeant in December 1914. He was 19 years old, 12 months after enlisting - He was on leave and attended the united Methodist church, he had previously been in France, this was early February 1918. He was the eldest son of the family. He was married and his wife lived at York Villas, Harris Street, Peterborough.  Lieutenant mentioned in dispatches of sir Douglas Haig. As an officer he did not have a service number.

Gordon W. Bloodworth  [Ref 331]   - 31-5-1918            "MENTIONED IN DISPATCHES"

"Lieut. Gordon W. Bloodworth, Sherwood Foresters, eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. G. W. Bloodworth, of Old Fletton, has been mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig's dispatches, published on Saturday.  Lieut. Bloodworth was wounded on the opening day of the German offensive, March 21st and is now convalescing at Altringham." 

Sunday before 15-2-1918 = was with the congregation of the Fletton United Methodist Church whilst home on leave from the front.

Gordon W. Bloodworth  [Ref 332] - 5-4-1918

"Captain Gordon Bloodworth, Sherwood Foresters, eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. G. W. Bloodworth, 1 St. Margaret's Road, Old Fletton, and husband of Mrs. Bloodworth York Villa, Harris Street, Peterborough, is wounded in the right hand.  On Wednesday a letter was received from Lieut. Bloodworth stating that his wound was not at all serious, and added "But I am pleased to say I am marked for Blighty."  A further letter announced that he was in hospital in Manchester and that he had been shot through the fingers at 20 yards' range.  Lieutenant Bloodworth joined the Army in October, 1914, and has seen service on the coast in Ireland as well as at the front."

Gordon W. Bloodworth  [Ref 212] - 21 July 1916 -  "MARRIAGE OF LIEUT. BLOODWORTH"

"A quiet but very pretty wedding took place at St. Mark's Church, Peterborough on Monday week, when Second Lieutenant Gordon Wm. Bloodworth, eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. G. W. Bloodworth, of Newlyn, Old Fletton, was married to Miss Hilda Maud Taylor, third daughter of Mr. & Mrs. James Taylor, of York Villa, Harris Street, Peterborough.  The ceremony was performed by the Rev. C. Curtis, and Mr. J. W. Roberts, A. R. C. O., organist, rendered festal and bridal music, suitable to the occasion.  The bride, who was given away by her father, looked charming in a biscuit coloured dress of tassic silk, with ninon sleeves vest of a sable colour, and picture hat to match.  She carried an ivory-bound prayer book, and wore a gold bangle, the gifts of the bridegroom.  The bridesmaids, Miss May Mould, a friend of the bride,  and Grace Bloodworth, sister of the bridegroom, were robed in cornflower blue silk with hats of pink and white lace.  Miss Dorothy Taylor, youngest sister of the bride, was prettily attired in white silk, with leghorn hat, trimmed with same.  Each wore a gold broach, the gift of the bridegroom.  Mr. Frank L. Bloodworth (brother), ably carried out the duties of best man.  After the ceremony a very happy family party was entertained at the home of the bride, and early in the evening Lieut. and Mrs. Bloodworth left for a short honeymoon.  The presents were many and variable, and the happy pair were the recipients of much goodwill and blessing.  Quite a batch of telegrams awaited their return from the Church, and others were received during the afternoon, including several from Ireland, where the bridegroom's regiment is stationed, he being attached to the 2/7 th Sherwood Foresters, now in camp at Oranmore, Co. Galway."

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26/08/2013

. . Martyn Smith