Ramsey in the war

When the Bombs fell on Ramsey.


It was felt that no list of names commemorating the people of Ramsey who died as a cause that could be attributed to the two World Wars would be complete without the mention of those who lost their lives when an enemy aircraft dropped four high-explosive bombs on Ramsey Town at 23.12p.m. on Saturday night, 22nd August 1942. Bombs completely demolished two houses, and many others were so badly damaged by the blasts that the occupants had to be evacuated. Other buildings, including the Methodist Chapel, the Council School and the Telephone Exchange, were also damage.  Miss Ruby Joan Rosher BELL, aged 31 years, the elder daughter of Ralph McLain & Anne BELL of 34 Field Terrace, was killed in the blast damaged home of her aunt, Mrs. Mary Ann ROSHER, and was buried in Ramsey cemetery. She had been a teacher at Ramsey Fortyfoot village school, and a voluntary helper in the report centre.

Mrs. Ethel Mary INGLE, aged 53, of 1 Field Terrace, was killed and her husband, Herbert INGLE, was injured, when a bomb dropped on their home. Mr. & Mrs. INGLE had recently heard that their only son had died of wounds while serving with the 7th Hussars in Burma. She was buried in Ramsey cemetery.

Hector Lewis CAMPBELL, aged 29 years, youngest son of Mrs. Laura Edith and the late Arthur William CAMPBELL of 38 High Street, was buried in Ramsey cemetery. He had been employed as a corn buyer & salesman etc. for Messrs. Herbert LARRATT & Co. Ltd. of Ramsey. Mrs. CAMPBELL had two other sons, Colin Featherstone CAMPBELL, who had lost his hairdressing business in the raid, and Maurice CAMPBELL.  Wilfred TATT, aged 34 years, son of Wilfred & Florence TATT, was buried in Ramsey cemetery. He left a widow Harriet Victoria TATT and a 14 years old son Victor, living in Little Whyte'

These last two men were in the street and dashed for a passage between two houses [next to 39 High Street] for shelter, when a bomb fell directly above them. They were buried beneath tons of masonry, and their bodies were not recovered until several hours later.
Mrs. Gwendoline Mary WORLOCK, aged 31 years, of 47 High Street, was killed by falling masonry, when her home was damaged by the blasts, and was buried in Ramsey cemetery. Her husband, G. H. WORLOCK, was a warrant officer in the Royal Air Force.  Charles CRUMP, aged 81 years, and his wife Ada CRUMP, aged 73 years, were both killed when their home was demolished by a bomb. Two evacuees from London, they had been living with the Misses Clara & Drusilla HARRISON at 36 High Street, a large house adjoining the Methodist Chapel. 

Mrs. Emma CROSS of 34 High Street, was badly injured in her blast damaged home. The wife of Reggie CROSS, she was taken to hospital where she was put on the danger list, and died a short time later.
 

From an unknown paper cutting - July/August 1949   -   Ramsey Parish War Memorial.

The names of all those who served in the Last War and, who, in doing so, gave their lives for their country, will be added to the Ramsey War Memorial. Ramsey Branch, British Legion, have completed the list written below. Will all Widows, Parents, Relatives and Friends please inform Major A. L. Price, Chairman, Ramsey Branch, British Legion, of 66, High Street, Ramsey, of any mistakes made to this list, stating full Christian names, ranks, and units, before 1st September 1949.
Avory, Lawrence Sidney, Stoker, Royal Navy.
Barlow, Wilfred Horace Raymond. A/C, R.A.F..
Bedford, Jack, L/Cpl., Cambridgeshire Regt..
Bowd, Lawrence, Sergt. R.A.F..
Breeze, Ernest William, Pte., 2nd Northamptonshire Regt..
Bullen, Albert, Royal Pioneer Corps.
Cade, Harry William, F/Sergt. R.A.F..
Carrington, Lawrence Eric, Pte., Hampshire Regt..
Cox, Harold, Pte., Q.R.R..
Cullip, Cyril, Pte., Q.R.R..
Davis, Phillip, F/O, R.A.F..
Dawson, George William, Sergt., R.A.F..
Dean, Claude Edwin, Pte., Suffolk Regt..
Edwards, Reginald, Pte., Saskatoon Regt..
Feast, John William, Gnr., Royal Artillery.
Francis, Alfred James William, Pte. Suffolk Regt..
Gilding, Maurice, W/O, R.A.F..
Greenwood, Cyril James, Pte., Q.R.R..
Greenwood, H. G., Driver, R.A.S.C..
Hibbins Ronald, Pte., Welch Regt..
Hodson, Cyril Taylor, Pte., R.O.A.C..
How, Geoffrey Arthur James, Cadet, Merchant Navy.
Ingle, Douglas, Tpr., R.A.C.. Attd. Queen's Own Hussars.
Johnson, Ronald Robert, Pte., Suffolk Regt..
Norfield, Oliver George, Gnr., Royal Artillery.
Oldham, Donald Curzon, Lieut., Rifle Brigade.
Palmer, Ernest Alfred, Sergt., 2/7 Middlesex Regt..
Palmer, John, F/O., R.A.F..
Papworth, Andrew, Pte., 5 Northamptonshire Regt.
Papworth, Arthur, Pte., Royal Lincolnshire Regt..
Peppercorn, Donald Harry James, L.A.C., R.A.F..
Pickard, Horace Arthur, Pte., Suffolk Regt..
Rosher, Eric, Sergt., R.A.F..
Sergeant, John, Capt., Royal Norfolk Regt..
Shepperson, Geoffrey, Cadet, Merchant Navy.
Smith, Ellis, Tpr., Queen's Royal Hussars.
Smith, Leslie John, Gnr., Royal Artillery.
Taylor, James Cyril, Pte., 4th Suffolk Regt..
Taylor, Joe.
Taylor Raymond Victor, Pte., Devonshire Regt..
Taylor, Terence, Pte., Devonshire Regt..
Willis, Peter, Wireless Operator, Merchant Navy.
Wilson, Francis V., Pte. 1st Cambridgeshire Regt..
Wilson, John W., Dvr., R.A.S.C..

CONCERT PROGRAMME     "BE PREPARED"

I.C.S.P.     Ramsey and Bury Group      Eigth Annual     CONCERT

Abbey Room, Ramsey.    Tuesday, April 16th, 1918.

The paper was printed by Harry King, Printer, Ramsey.

On the rear of the programme were the following names.

Roll of Honour.

Royal Horse Artillery: J. Gowler
Northamptonshire Regiment: C. Loftus - T. Pettit.
Sherwood Foresters: J. Yerrell.
Bedfordshire Yeomanry: C. Bridgefoot - J. Kirby - V. Hill - B. Newton - A. Papworth - A. Ilett - L. Shepperson - E. Warrington.
Royal Suffolk Yeomanry: W. Everett.
Hunts. Cyclist Battalion: G. Bowyer - L. Everett - H. Cooper - B. Rule - H. Storey - S. Yerrell - S. Berridge - F. Leggett.
Bedfordshire Regiment: R. Davis - W. Stokes - D. Barlow - E. Palmer.
Royal Flying Corps: R. Harvey - G. Barnes.
Motor Machine Gun Section: G. Middleton.
6th Essex Regiment: H. Harding.
Army Remount Depot: B. Loftus.
Honourable Artillery Company: C. Fisher.
Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve: E. Bowyer - F. Papworth - E. Cade - R. Marriott.
Royal Garrison Artillery: G. Avery.
Royal Navy: J. Davis.
King's Royal Rifles: H. Bowyer - E. Smart.
Royal Fusiliers: J. Kelly.
Gloucestershire Regiment: H. Pettit
E. Surrey Regiment: F. Hornsby.

Notes from Joan Whitwell - It was felt that no list of names commemorating the people of Ramsey who died as a cause that could be attributed to the two World Wars would be complete without the mention of those who lost their lives when an enemy aircraft dropped four high-explosive bombs on Ramsey Town at 23.12p.m. on Saturday night, 22nd August 1942.  Bombs completely demolished two houses, and many others were so badly damaged by the blasts that the occupants had to be evacuated.  Other buildings, including the Methodist Chapel, the Council School and the Telephone Exchange, were also damaged

Miss Ruby Joan Rosher BELL, aged 31 years, the elder daughter of Ralph McLain & Anne BELL of 34 Field Terrace, was killed in the blast damaged home of her aunt, Mrs. Mary Ann ROSHER, and was buried in Ramsey cemetery.  She had been a teacher at Ramsey Fortyfoot village school, and a voluntary helper in the report centre.

Mrs. Ethel Mary INGLE, aged 53, of 1 Field Terrace, was killed and her husband, Herbert INGLE, was injured, when a bomb dropped on their home.  Mr. & Mrs. INGLE had recently heard that their only son had died of wounds while serving with the 7th Hussars in Burma.  She was buried in Ramsey cemetery.

Hector Lewis CAMPBELL, aged 29 years, youngest son of Mrs. Laura Edith and the late Arthur William CAMPBELL of 38 High Street, was buried in Ramsey cemetery.  He had been employed as a corn buyer & salesman etc. for Messrs. Herbert LARRATT & Co. Ltd. of Ramsey.  Mrs. CAMPBELL had two other sons, Colin Featherstone CAMPBELL, who had lost his hairdressing business in the raid, and Maurice CAMPBELL.

Wilfred TATT, aged 34 years, son of Wilfred & Florence TATT, was buried in Ramsey cemetery.  He left a widow Harriet Victoria TATT and a 14 years old son Victor, living in Little Whyte.

These last two men were in the street and dashed for a passage between two houses [ next to 39 High Street] for shelter, when a bomb fell directly above them.  They were buried beneath tons of masonry, and their bodies were not recovered until several hours later.

Mrs. Gwendoline Mary WORLOCK, aged 31 years, of 47 High Street, was killed by falling masonry, when her home was damaged by the blasts, and was buried in Ramsey cemetery.  Her husband, G.H. WORLOCK, was a warrant officer in the Royal Air Force.

Charles CRUMP, aged 81 years, and his wife Ada CRUMP, aged 73 years, were both killed when their home was demolished by a bomb.  Two evacuees from London, they had been living with the Misses Clara & Drusilla HARRISON at 36 High Street, a large house adjoining the Methodist Chapel.

Mrs. Emma CROSS of 34 High Street, was badly injured in her blast damaged home.  The wife of Reggie CROSS, she was taken to hospital where she was put on the danger list, and died a short time later.

RAMSEY MAN BREAKS INTO VERSE.     One of the Ramsey boys was not very much enamoured of his “pitch” in Ireland.

He  broke out into verse and here is the result:–

There’s a wild desolate spot I’d like to mention

Where all you hear is “Stand at Ease”, “Slope Arms”, “Quick March”, “Attention”.

It’s miles away from anywhere – by gad, it is a rum ‘un.

A chap lived there for fifty years and never saw a wom–un!

 

There are lots of little huts, all dotted here and there:

For those who have to live inside I’ve offered many a prayer!

Outside the huts, there’s rats as big as nanny goats –

Last night a soldier saw one trying on his overcoat.

 

It’s mud up to the eyebrows;  you get it in your ears:

But into it you’ve got to go, without a sign of fear.

And when you’ve had a bath of mud, you just set to and groom,

And get cleaned up for next parade – or else it’s orderly room!

 

Week in, week out, from morn till night, with full pack and a rifle.

Like Jack and Jill, you climb the hill – of course that’s just a trifle.

“Slope Arms”, “Fixed Bayonet”, then “Present”:  they fairly put you through it,

And as you stagger to your hut, the sergeant shouts “Jump to it!”

 

With tunics, boots and puttees off, you quickly get the habit,

You gallop up and down the hills, just like a blooming rabbit.

“Heads backward bend”, “Arms upward stretch”, “Heels raise”,

then “Ranks change places”.

Later on they make you put your kneecaps where your face is.

 

When the War is over and we’ve captured Kaiser Billy

To shoot him would be merciful and absolutely silly.

Just send him down to  ––––––  Camp, amongst the rats and clay,

I’ll bet he won’t be long before he fades away.

Hunts Post – 7 September 1917.

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21/01/2015

. . Martyn Smith ©