Ramsey Soldiers - W.

The First World War.
 Name  

 Notes on sold

Wade - H. B.
Warner - Sidney George

WARNER, Sidney George – Private – 267564, 1st/1st Bucks. Bn. Oxford & Bucks. Light Infantry.

From Ramsey, born at Eaton, son of Samuel & Annie WARNER, enlisted at Huntingdon, and was killed in action in France on Tuesday, 15th August 1916, aged about 26 years, and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France.  He left a widow Christiana (nee WILLMER) WARNER, who he married at Ramsey on 16th July 1916, just a few weeks before his death.      [Not on Ramsey memorial;  on St. Neots memorial] Formerly 1574 1/1st Hunts. Cyclist Bn.

Warrington - H. V.

From a local newspaper his name appears as having enlisted in the Army by June 10th 1915 –
Warrington - Frederick

WARRINGTON, Frederick – Private – G.163831,   ‘C’ Company, 7th Bn. Royal Sussex Regt.

He was the son of Selina (nee WARRINGTON) MOSSENDEN of Oilmills Road, Ramsey Mereside, enlisted at Huntingdon, and died of wounds on Tuesday, 24th September 1918, aged about 20 years, and was buried in the Saulcourt Churchyard Extension, Guyencourt-Saulcourt, Somme, France.  He was wounded when his battalion was taking part in the attempt to break through the Hindenburg Line, while serving with the British Expeditionary Force.     [Also on Pondersbridge memorial]

Warrington - L. Research Ongoing.
Watson - J. E. From a local newspaper his name appears as having enlisted in the Army by June 10th 1915 –

From a local newspaper dated 30/4/1915 = Huntingdonshire Casualties - The following casualties are officially published:- WOUNDED Pte. J. E. Watson, Ramsey [Boston Territorials].

Watson - J. W. From a local newspaper his name appears as having enlisted in the Army by June 10th 1915 –Watson, J. W., R. H. A. [wounded]
Watson - J. 2106 - 3/11/1917 - From a local newspaper - Local War News - Roll of Honour - KILLED Pte. J. Watson, Ramsey Heights, Beds. Regt.
Webb - Albert

A. I. F., Ramsey, Killed - note in paper 12th October 1918.

WEBB, Albert – Lance Corporal – 768, 41st Bn. Australian Infantry, Australian Imperial Force.

He was born at West Wickham, Cambs, eldest son of Mr. Albert WEBB of Bury Road, Ramsey, was killed in action on Sunday, 1st September 1918, aged about 27 years, and is commemorated on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, which stands in the Villers-Bretonneux Military Cemetery, Somme, France.

Wells - George

WELLS, George, 7th Bn. Rifle Brigade.                    [Added to Ramsey memorial]

Pte. George WELLS, 7th Bn. Rifle Brigade – formerly a footman to Lord de Ramsey, he joined the 7th Bn. Rifle Brigade in August 1914.  After he had been wounded, he recovered and went back to the fighting line, and was killed in action on Saturday.  5th Nov 1915 – Pte. George Wells was the son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Earl, of Greenhall, Ramsey.  He had been in Australia about four years and joined the Army there.  A letter form the Chaplain attached to deceased’s battalion appears in our Huntingdonshire war news.

White - George From a local newspaper his name appears as having enlisted in the Army by June 10th 1915 –White, Grenadiers.

WHITE, George – Lance Sergeant – 11367, 2nd Bn. Grenadier Guards.

He was born 17th August 1884 at Buckden, son of William & Elizabeth WHITE.  At the outbreak of the War he was a member of the Hunts. Constabulary stationed at Ramsey.  Being on the Reserve, he was called up on 5th August 1914, joined the Grenadier Guards and went to France with the first Expeditionary Force.  For some time he was an instructor at his base.  He died of a fractured skull, the result of an accident, on Monday, 26th March 1917, aged 32yrs, and was buried in the St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France.  The news of his death was a great shock to his wife and young son, who had recently received a message from him saying that his term of service had expired and that he hoped to be home within a few days.    [Also on Buckden memorial]
Whitwell - Russell

WHITWELL, Russell – Private – G.14908, 13th Bn. Royal Sussex Regt.

He was the eldest son of Russell & Emma (nee TYE) WHITWELL of Pondersbridge, was killed in action while serving with the British Expeditionary Force on Wednesday, 13th September 1916, aged 18 years, and his grave is in the Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, Somme, France.  The 13th Battalion, together with the 11th & 12th Bns, trained at Cooden, near Bexhill, and later at Witley Camp, and arrived in France on 5th March 1916, where they took part in the attack on Aubers Ridge on 30th June, and were then moved to the Somme.  He was a machine gunner and whilst doing his duty in the Front Line, must have seen a trench mortar coming over from the enemy trenches because he apparently took cover in a dug-out.  The mortar landed near him, and the explosion caused the earth and sandbags to be thrown into the air and then fall on top of him, and he was dead by the time the stretcher bearers finally managed to get to him.     [Also on Ramsey St. Marys & Pondersbridge memorials]
White - George Herbert From a local newspaper his name appears as having enlisted in the Army by June 10th 1915 –White, G. H., Huntingdonshire Cyclist Battalion.

WHITE, George Herbert – Private – 32772, 187th Coy. Machine Gun Corps.  (Infantry).

From Ramsey St. Marys, son of Samuel & Bertha (nee WRIGHT) WHITE, enlisted at Huntingdon on 10th November 1914.  He died of wounds received in action in Mesopotamia on Saturday, 10th February 1917, aged about 19 years, and his grave is in the Amara War Cemetery, Iraq.    [Also on Ramsey St. Marys memorial]  Formerly 1026 Hunts. Cyclist Bn.

Willis - Frank

WILLIS, Frank – Private – 82858, Royal Fusiliers  (City of London Regt, posted to 2/2nd London Regt).

He was born at Stilton, son of George & Jane (nee COX) WILLIS of Lotting Fen, Ramsey Heights, enlisted at Bedford.  He was killed in action on Wednesday, 24th April 1918, aged 19 years, and is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, which encloses the Pozieres British Cemetery, Somme, France.  Formerly 30096 Bedfordshire Regt.

Wilson - Jesse 1/12/1916 - From a local newspaper - Local War News - Roll of Honour - WOUNDED Pte. J. Wilson Beds. Regt., Ramsey.

WILSON, Jesse – Private – 23739, 2nd Bn. Bedfordshire Regt.

He was from Ramsey, son of Jesse & Elizabeth WILSON, was killed in action on Sunday, 9th September 1917, aged about 21 years, and his grave is in the Oosttaverne Wood Cemetery, Heuvelland, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.    [Also on Ramsey St. Marys memorial]
Woods - Arthur

From a local newspaper dated 13/10/1916 - Huntingdonshire Casualties - The following casualties appear in the official lists:-  WOUNDED Pte. A. Woods, Ramsey St. Mary's, North Lancs.

WOOD, Arthur – Private – 26123, 9th Bn. Loyal North Lancashire Regt.

He was born at Ramsey St. Marys, son of Samuel & the late Jane (nee ROBINSON) WOOD, had served with the British Expeditionary Force in the trenches in France for about a year, when he was killed in action.  He died on Sunday, 3rd September 1916, aged 24 years, and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France.      [Also on Ramsey St. Marys & Pondersbridge memorials]  Formerly 26016 Bedfordshire Regt.

Woodward - Feary

WOODWARD, Feary – Private – 46535, 6th Bn. Northamptonshire Regt.

He was born at Pondersbridge, son of George Alfred & Elizabeth Ann (nee CUMBRIDGE) WOODWARD, enlisted at Peterborough.  He was killed in action on Sunday, 9th May 1915, aged about 19 years, and is commemorated on Le Touret Memorial, located at the east end of Le Touret Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France.     [Not on Ramsey memorial;  on Pondersbridge & Whittlesey memorials]

Woolley - F. From an unknown newspaper dated July 3rd 1915 = 'Ramsey Trooper Wounded.'

Trooper F. Woolley, 1st Life Guards [son of Mr. Woolley, gamekeeper on Colonel Mowbray's estate Upwood], writing to his parents from a hospital in France, says:- 'You will be surprised to hear that I am wounded in this short time. I have got a snack in the face and right arm, but am getting on nicely now, and hope I shall soon be back in the firing line. This is not like pheasant shooting, as we don't have to pick them up and carry on. My Chum when I met in London was killed straight out at the same time I was wounded.' Trooper Woolley enlisted for twelve years when war broke out. He had only been in the trenches two days when wounded, on June 2nd, at Roulers.
Before going for a soldiers Trooper Woolley was assistant gamekeeper on the Abbots Ripton Estate.
Wright -  [P.C.] From a local newspaper his name appears as having enlisted in the Army by June 10th 1915 –Wright, [P.C.], Sergt., Royal Irish.
   
   
   
   
The Second World War.
 Name  

 Notes on soldier.

WHITAKER - William Butler.

William Butler WHITAKER, served as Flying Officer/Navigator No. 130596 in the      Royal Air Force  (Volunteer Reserve).  He was the youngest son of John William & Ellen Isadore (nee BUTLER) WHITAKER of Ramsey, later of Fishponds, Glos, was killed in action on Sunday, 23rd May 1943, aged 22 years, and interred in the Markelo General Cemetery, Holland.  He is remembered on the Ramsey War Memorial.

WHITEHEAD - Edwin.

Edwin WHITEHEAD,  served as Sergeant, No. 920681 in the 135 (The Hertfordshire Yeomanry) Field Regt, Royal Artillery.  He was the son of Herbert John & Alice Elizabeth (nee TURNER) WHITEHEAD of Yaxley, was killed in action on Monday, 26th January 1942, aged 21 years, and is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial, which stands in the Kranji War Cemetery, Singapore.     [Not on Ramsey memorial;  on Ramsey Grammar School memorial & Yaxley memorials] He is remembered on the Ramsey War Memorial. 

Edwin WHITEHEAD, R.A.   His name was inscribed on the original Wooden tablet in Sports Pavilion on Playing Field at Ramsey Grammar School. This memorial tablet is now located in the main Abbey building.  This Pavilion was given to the School by Old Grammarians in proud and lasting memory of the fifteen Old Boys who lost their lives in World War II.

WILLIS - Peter James Ailwyn

Peter James Ailwyn WILLIS, served as Second Radio Officer on the S.S. ROWANBANK (Glasgow), Merchant Navy.  He was born 24th July 1922, son of John & Marion WILLIS of the School House, Ramsey Fortyfoot, died when the ship on which he was serving was sunk on Friday, 31st January 1941, aged 18 years, and is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, in the garden of Trinity Square, London.  The 5,159 ton ROWANBANK, owned by Bank Line Ltd. was bombed and sunk some 1,100 miles from Merignac (near Bordeaux, France), en route from Lourence Marques (on the south coast of Mozambique, South Africa), to Oban, Scotland, and all her crew of 68 were lost – it was one of eight vessels sunk in January 1941 by Focke Wulf 200 Kondor (German) aircraft in the Western Approaches..  Mr. & Mrs. WILLIS’ other son Tom WILLIS was serving with the Royal Navy.    [Also on Ramsey Grammar School memorial] He is remembered on the Ramsey War Memorial.

Peter WILLIS, M. N.   His name was inscribed on the original Wooden tablet in Sports Pavilion on Playing Field at Ramsey Grammar School. This memorial tablet is now located in the main Abbey building.  This Pavilion was given to the School by Old Grammarians in proud and lasting memory of the fifteen Old Boys who lost their lives in World War II.

WILSON - Francis Victor

Francis Victor WILSON, served as Private No. 5827782 in the 1st Bn. Cambridgeshire Regt, Suffolk Regt.  He was born 27th December 1918, youngest son of Charles & Mary Ann (nee WHITE) WILSON of 70 The Avenue, Ramsey, died at sea while a prisoner-of-war in Japanese hands in Thailand on Thursday, 21st September 1944, aged 25 years, and is commemorated on the Singapore Memorial, which stands in the Kranji War Cemetery, Singapore.  He was taken prisoner at Singapore, and worked in No. 1 (Prison) Camp, Thailand. He is remembered on the Ramsey War Memorial.

Wilson - George. From an unknown newspaper dated June 15th 1918 = 'Ramsey Resident Torpedoed.'
On Sunday Mr. George A. Wilson, the well-known landlord of the 'Vine' Hotel, Ramsey, arrived home after experiencing the terror of being torpedoed at sea by an enemy submarine.
Mr. Wilson was a steward on the Kenilworth Castle Liner, which was returning to England after visiting East, South and West Africa. There was a full complement of passengers, and when within packing-up time and nearing Plymouth the vessel was struck about midnight on the 3rd June. Mr. Wilson was half asleep in his bunk, but the force of the explosion threw him across the cabin and partly dazed him.
He was getting up when a second explosion occurred and all the lights went out. Water began getting round him, and shouts and screams made him realise the seriousness of the position. He groped his way around the corridor to the staircase, but found that means of exit had been blown away. Striking an emergency match he saw a heap of wreckage and bodies, but climbing over he managed to get on deck, and made his way to the lifeboat station.
One lifeboat on being lowered turned turtle and the Red Cross nurses and sailors therein were thrown into the water. Their cries were awful. He assisted as best he could until he fell into the sea, where his lifebelt kept him afloat until picked up, bruised all over, by a T. B. Destroyer and landed at Plymouth, where he was taken into hospital. Mr.. Wilson originally joined the Royal Navy, but received his discharge about a year ago, went as steward in the Kenilworth Castle.
WILSON, John William

Private/Driver John William WILSON,  served as T/49644 in the Royal Army Service Corps., He was born 5th October 1904, eldest son of Charles & Mary Ann WILSON of 70 The Avenue, Ramsey, was mobilised on 2nd September and died twelve days later at Aldershot, on Thursday night, 14th September 1939, aged 35 years, and was buried in Ramsey Cemetery.  He had just posted a letter to his wife when his motorcycle was involved in an accident with a lorry that was on the wrong side of the road, killing him instantly.  A claim for damages for negligence was settled on his widow in May 1940.  Besides the widow Ivy (nee BAILEY) WILSON, he left seven children aged between six months to fourteen years, living at 20 West Avenue, Ramsey.  Before being called-up as a reservist, he had been employed as an M. T. driver at the R.A.F. Station, Upwood.  He is remembered on the Ramsey War Memorial.

Associated Information.
 Name   Notes on person.
WORLOCK - Gwendoline Mary.

Research by Joan Whitwell = No list of names commemorating the people of Ramsey who died as a cause that could be attributed to the two World Wars would be complete without the mention of those who lost their lives when an enemy aircraft dropped four high-explosive bombs on Ramsey Town at 23.12p.m. on Saturday night, 22nd August 1942.  Bombs completely demolished two houses, and many others were so badly damaged by the blasts that the occupants had to be evacuated.  Other buildings, including the Methodist Chapel, the Council School and the Telephone Exchange, were also damaged.

Mrs. Gwendoline Mary WORLOCK, aged 31 years, of 47 High Street, was killed by falling masonry, when her home was damaged by the blasts, and was buried in Ramsey cemetery.  Her husband, G.H. WORLOCK, was a warrant officer in the Royal Air Force.

Wilson - George. From an unknown newspaper dated June 15th 1918 = 'Ramsey Resident Torpedoed.'
On Sunday Mr. George A. Wilson, the well-known landlord of the 'Vine' Hotel, Ramsey, arrived home after experiencing the terror of being torpedoed at sea by an enemy submarine.
Mr. Wilson was a steward on the Kenilworth Castle Liner, which was returning to England after visiting East, South and West Africa. There was a full complement of passengers, and when within packing-up time and nearing Plymouth the vessel was struck about midnight on the 3rd June. Mr. Wilson was half asleep in his bunk, but the force of the explosion threw him across the cabin and partly dazed him.
He was getting up when a second explosion occurred and all the lights went out. Water began getting round him, and shouts and screams made him realise the seriousness of the position. He groped his way around the corridor to the staircase, but found that means of exit had been blown away. Striking an emergency match he saw a heap of wreckage and bodies, but climbing over he managed to get on deck, and made his way to the lifeboat station.
One lifeboat on being lowered turned turtle and the Red Cross nurses and sailors therein were thrown into the water. Their cries were awful. He assisted as best he could until he fell into the sea, where his lifebelt kept him afloat until picked up, bruised all over, by a T. B. Destroyer and landed at Plymouth, where he was taken into hospital. Mr.. Wilson originally joined the Royal Navy, but received his discharge about a year ago, went as steward in the Kenilworth Castle.
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